Week 3 Video Lessons

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    • #28413
      Pasyanthi
      Keymaster

      Please use this thread to post your questions/Impressions/Questions/Comments and learnings from week 3 video lessons

    • #29191

      Hi,

      Thanks for the Q and A video on Vedic Maths. It has deepened my understanding.

      In video 1 – lesson 9

      Practice 2 & question 2,

      5/12 + 5/18 = 25/36

      Answer should be 25/36 .

      In answers sheet it is mentioned as 25/24.

      Thanks,

      Mallika

    • #29192
      KennethWilliams
      Keymaster

      Thanks Mallika. But the question asks for 5/12 + 5/8, so I think it is ok.

    • #29193

      You are right Ken. I misread the question. Sorry.

    • #29197
      Satya
      Participant

      Thanks for providing more insight on Vedic Maths and I really like the question and answers format.

      One more question that I think parents have in mind including me is – What is the recommended age for kids to start learning/introduce Vedic Maths in general? Any views on this Ken sir?

      Thank you

      • #29198
        KennethWilliams
        Keymaster

        Thanks Satya, this is a very good question. But it isn’t that easy to answer as it depends on the child, parent, teacher etc.

        The best answer is to start as early as possible. Little puzzles and fun games can be given to the very young children, once they are familiar with the basic number concept (units, tens etc.). So, ask ‘how old are you?’. Double it.
        How long til your favourite TV programme – How many minutes is that?
        That’s an interesting number on that car. Add up its digits. What change shall I expect from this purchase?
        Questions can be relevant/topical. But for the young child is is imperative that it is approached in a fun way, as a game. Children are keen to show off their abilities and should be praised whenever possible. We must not see learning maths as rigid – just the opposite.

        This VMTTC course does not start off at such a level though, the reason being that my own experience mostly starts with older children. If you want to teach VM you will need to decide what ages you will accept, and you could accept 5 year olds or even younger.

        If the question is, at what age can children be taught the methods on this course, the answer would be about 8 years for the early parts of the course. My three Teacher’s Manuals were written to provide structured lessons for teachers of children of different ages.

        I also recommend the work of Vera Stevens. See:
        https://www.pebblemaths.org/
        This is great for very young children and Vera has also had amazing successes with children with all sorts of difficulties.

    • #29199
      Satya
      Participant

      Thank you, great explanation. This way of introducing math since early ages gives them strong foundation and improves their interest levels.

    • #29241

      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>Hi, </span></p>
      <b id=”docs-internal-guid-f1573482-7fff-13d9-0261-5e660db8d732″ style=”font-weight: normal;”> </b>
      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>This is regarding bar numbers. </span><b style=”font-weight: normal;”></b></p>
      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>If we subtract a positive number from it’s bar number the answer is always 0.</span><b style=”font-weight: normal;”></b></p>
      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>Example.</span><b style=”font-weight: normal;”></b></p>
      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>2(3)1 = 171</span><b style=”font-weight: normal;”></b></p>
      <p dir=”ltr”></p>
      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>  2(3)1</span></p>
      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>- 1 7 1</span></p>
      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”> -1        is a carry from the 10th place ; -3-7 = -10</span></p>
      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>______</span></p>
      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>  0 0</span> <span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>0</span></p>
      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>______</span></p>
      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>Can we use this as a checking mechanism to see whether our bar conversions are correct or not. It is a little overhead, we can use it till we get familiar with conversions.</span></p>
      <p dir=”ltr”></p>
      <p dir=”ltr” style=”line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;”><span style=”font-size: 15pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;”>Thanks</span></p>
      <p dir=”ltr”></p>

      • #29242
        KennethWilliams
        Keymaster

        Hi Mallika,

        I don’t know what happened with your post 🙂
        I think you are asking about using digit sums to check bar number conversions. That is certainly true. For example 19 = 2(1) both have a digit sum of 1.

        It is a good point – thank you.

    • #29246

      Hi Ken,

      It has generated html code for my post 🙁   I have tried to edit it but no luck.

      My original post says if we subtract positive number from it’s bar number the answer is always zero and thought of using this for checking mechanism. But digit sum is easy way to do it. Thank You Ken.

      Thanks, Mallika

       

    • #29283

      Hi,

      This is regarding fractions.

      We can add or subtract mixed fractions without converting them into improper fractions.

      But for multiplication and division, we have to convert mixed fractions into improper fractions before doing the operation.

      Is there any easy method or am I missing something?

      Thanks, Mallika.

      • #29286
        KennethWilliams
        Keymaster

        Hi Mallika,

        Yes, you need to convert to improper fractions in that case.

        But once you see lesson 13 you will be able to do the multiplication without converting to improper form.

      • #29890

        Hi Ken,

        I have watched lesson 13. I didn’t understand how to multiply mixed fractions without converting them to improper fractions. I tried to apply vertical crosswise, but somehow I didn’t get it. Can you pls help me.

        thanks,

        Mallika

      • #29891
        KennethWilliams
        Keymaster

        Hi Mallika,

        Suppose you want 1 1/3 + 2 1/4 (1 and a third + 2 and a quarter):

        1           1/3
        2          1/4

        You multiply vertically on the left, then the two crosswise multiplications, then vertically on the right.

        Adding these four products gives the answer.

         

      • #29893
        KennethWilliams
        Keymaster

        Hi Mallika,

        I meant 1 1/3 x 2 1/4, multiplication, not addition.

      • #30282

        Thanks Ken.

         

        1    1/3

        2   1/4

        1*2 + 2*1/3 + 1*1/4 + 1/3 * 1/4

        2+3  7/12+ 1/12

        5  8/12 is the answer I am getting.

         

        but if I convert same fractions into improper fractions and do multiplication

        4/3* 9/4 = 43/12 = 3 7/12.

         

        somewhere I am going wrong Ken.

        Regards.

         

      • #30283
        KennethWilliams
        Keymaster

        Not quite sure what you did there Mallika.

        The crosswise parts are 2/3 and 1/4.
        Adding these gives 11/12.
        So you have 2 + 11/12 + 1/12, which is exactly 3.

        By the improper fraction method you should have 4*9 / 3*4 = 36/12 = 3 again.

      • #30287

        Thanks a lot Ken!!

        I understood where I was going wrong.

    • #29358

      Thanks Ken for the clarification.

    • #29359
      Maurice Perry
      Participant

      Just need Clarification. a number like 7934, I would think 7 and 3 would be odd numbers. Yet you called them even. I think im missing the point.

      • This reply was modified 8 months, 3 weeks ago by Maurice Perry.
      • #29361
        KennethWilliams
        Keymaster

        Hi Maurice,

        Certainly 7 and 3 are odd numbers.

        I’m not sure what you are referring to. Perhaps I was talking about the position of the digit, so in 7934 the 7 is in the 4th position from the right which is even.

      • #29732
        Maurice Perry
        Participant

        Ken,

        Im pretty sure that’s where I got it confused. You were referring to the position. Now im back on track.

         

        Thanks!

    • #29688
      Fabio Zanatta
      Participant

      Hello,

      I need a clarification on the lesson 9.

      Into the part “Adding/ Subtracting fractions” I can see:

      3/4+5/6=19/24

      In that case I can obtain 19 with cross multiplication: 3×3+5×2=19. The number 2 is 4/2 and 3 is 6/2 (where 4 and 6 are denominators of the fractions): why you can divide 4 and 6 by 2? It’s because 2 is common by two numbers?

       

      Thanks

      • #29689
        KennethWilliams
        Keymaster

        That’s right Fabio.

        If the denominators have a common factor you divide them both by that factor.

        You don’t have to do it but it makes the calculation easier.

    • #29806
      Savita P Kulkarni
      Participant

      This week was little tight for me. I just went through all the posts.

      Thanks Mallika for the observation of digital sum check for bar nos.

      I would love to look at the 3 manuals Mr. Ken. Are they available for us to buy?

      I would certainly look into the website pebblemaths.org, thank you friends and Mr. Ken.

      Is there a template for assig. 1? ( I think somebody has asked this question in that forum)

      thanks all

    • #29901
      Shikha Dhingra
      Participant

      Hi Ken

      Its a question from week 4. Practice 4 question 6.       79×105 . I am getting the wrong answer. Can you pls explain

       

       

      • #30268
        KennethWilliams
        Keymaster

        Hi Shikha,

        It goes like this:

        79   –   21
        105  +    5
        84 / -105   =   8295

        The -1 in the -105 needs to go to the left to give 83/-05.
        Then take another 1 from the 83 so that you can take 5 from 100 to give the 95.

        I hope that makes it clear.

    • #29902
      Preeti Pathak
      Participant

      Hello,

      Bar numbers in lesson 11(week 3) is a useful concept with many advantages.The bar notation which we used ,were to show repeating numbers after the decimal  point like 3.3333……..=3.(3) i.e 3 point bar 3.

      It was used to show the number pattern which goes on forever(infinity).

      I had an impression that Bar notation can only be used if the number is the decimal number.

      But now I understand that apart from being used in decimal numbers only,it has many more advantages.

      Thanks

       

      • #30269
        KennethWilliams
        Keymaster

        Hi Preeti,

        It is unfortunate that in the USA a bar over a digit or digits is used in numbers after the decimal point to show that that digit or digit sequence recurs. In the UK we put a dot over the first and last digits of a recurring sequence in a decimal.

        So we are making a different use of a bar over a digit here. We are following Tirthaji’s system, and in fact a bar over a digit makes sense as a negative as it is the same as a minus sign, only it goes on top.

    • #30264
      Shikha Dhingra
      Participant

      Hi Ken

      I have a doubt in question 6 (practice 4) lesson 15.

      17 x 16  My answer is 282 but the answer in the course book is 272. pls clarify

      17 -3

      16 -4

      ——

      13/12    1 at tens place will be added to 3     therefore 142

      as base is 20 we multiply by 14 by 2 therefore 282

      ___

      • #30270
        KennethWilliams
        Keymaster

        Hi Shikha,

        You need to double the 13 before carrying the 1 over.

    • #30279
      Shikha Dhingra
      Participant

      Thanks Ken

       

    • #30489
      Amara Deepthi
      Participant

      Hi Ken,

      In Home work Manual Lession 5, Practice – C, 4th question answer is a typo. 1000-97 = 903 (and not 22). Please confirm.

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